Hapus Dydd Gwyl Dewi

© 3Di Associates Photography

St. David                                      © 3Di Associates Photography

 

It’s the beginning of March and I am currently spending some time in Wales. I’ve never been here for St. David’s Day before and I was rather hoping for a mass parade of welsh hats and daffodils. Maybe the mythological dragon could have reared its fiery head, but alas, it’s just a normal day in a quiet seaside town with a slight acknowledgement from the residents that this is a significant day.

What has St. David’s Day got to do with philosophy? Nothing much, other than every day is a day of philosophy. Philosophy isn’t all about what if’s and hypotheticals. Philosophy is about thinking, and it’s also about not thinking. It can be a silent, almost unknowing reflection on what this life of ours is all about.

Being here made me wonder whether there was an array of welsh philosophers. With the ever obliging Wikipedia, I discovered a range of names that I am looking forward to studying further. The first name alphabetically was Richard Ithamar Aaron who wrote two pieces that have caught my eye; “The history and value of the distinction between intellect and intuition” and “The Nature of Knowing”. I look forward to more internet searching to try and find some extracts from these works.

© 3Di Associates Photography

A Lonely Daffodil                                   © 3Di Associates Photography

 

In our opinion there certainly is a distinction between intellect and intuition, and both are extremely valuable to knowing our world and ourselves. The nature of knowing is so important, and particularly prevalent in a time when our Secretary of State is insistent that “knowing” is all as far as educating our next generation.

Yet here is an important distinction that is worth a moment of thought – an act of philosophising. Is knowledge important or is it the nature of the knowledge that is most significant? What is the nature of knowledge? What real understanding does knowledge give us? Isn’t what constitutes knowledge, with all its multi-faceted components, the real nature of knowledge rather than knowledge itself?

Today, as we said is St. David’s Day. What should you or I do with this knowledge? Buy a bunch of daffodils? Phone a Welsh relative? Learn about St. David? It’s what we do with the knowledge that’s important.

Today, many children across the UK as well as in Wales will be learning about St. David. They will be given the knowledge and they will probably be asked to recite or regurgitate it in some way, but what will they ultimately do with that knowledge – store it in their brains for future reference or do something immediately with their knowledge?

Yesterday, I decided that I would find out a little more about St. David too. I’m not sure yet what I am going to do with this knowledge other than post a few related photographs on this blog. What fascinates me more is that my determination to write something about St. David today has led to a journey of philosophy about knowledge instead of my original purpose – of writing about St. David. What I am now more interested in is how this sort of knowledge about St. David might be used by others and not about the actual factual knowledge itself. I’m intrigued as to how knowledge acts as a stimulus to learning and isn’t the end product of learning.

Enjoy the photos and have a think about the nature of knowledge. What is the real value of knowledge, and will the fact that St. David was born about 500 AD and taught across the land really be the most important thing that you or I learn today? Or will the photographs themselves ignite another spark that is completely unrelated to the Welsh Saint?

St. David's Shrine © 3Di Associates Photography

St. David’s Shrine                             © 3Di Associates Photography

 

…………………………………………………………………….

Hapus Dydd Gwyl Dewi.

Words by Dylan Thomas

© 3Di Associates Photography

St. David’s Cathedral                   © 3Di Associates Photography

“On the last street wave praised
The unwinding, song by rocks
Of the woven wall
Of his father’s house in the sands”

© 3Di Associates Photography

“Birds and the birds of the winged trees flying my name   
      Above the farms and the white horses
                  And I rose. “
© 3Di Associates Photography

Slate sculpture at St. David’s Museum              © 3Di Associates Photography

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.”

© 3Di Associates Photography

Alleged birthplace of St. David                      © 3Di Associates Photography

“Shall gods be said to thump the clouds
When clouds are cursed by thunder.”

© 3Di Associates Photography

© 3Di Associates Photography

“Lie still, be calmed, sufferer with the wound.” 

© 3Di Associates Photography

© 3Di Associates Photography

Once below a time,
When my pinned-around-the-spirit
Cut-to-measure flesh bit,
Suit for a serial sum
On the first of each hardship,

© 3Di Associates Photography

© 3Di Associates Photography

“There round about your stones the shades
Of children go who, from their voids,
Cry to the dolphined sea.”

 

© 3Di Associates Photography

© 3Di Associates Photography

“Light breaks where no sun shines;
Where no sea runs, the waters of the heart
Push in their tides.”

 

© 3Di Associates Photography

© 3Di Associates Photography

“In the sun that is young once only,
Time let me play and be
Golden in the mercy of his means.”

 

Inside St. David's

© 3Di Associates Photography

“They shall have stars at elbow and foot;
Though they go mad they shall be sane,
Though they sink through the sea they shall rise again;
Though lovers be lost love shall not;
And death shall have no dominion.”

 

© 3Di Associates Photography

© 3Di Associates Photography

“In the final direction of the elementary town I advance as long as forever is.”


 

© 3Di Associates Photography

© 3Di Associates Photography

Light breaks where no sun shines;
Where no sea runs, the waters of the heart
Push in their tides.”

© 3Di Associates Photography

© 3Di Associates Photography

 

Here In This spring

Here in this spring, stars float along the void;
Here in this ornamental winter
Down pelts the naked weather;
This summer buries a spring bird.

Symbols are selected from the years’
Slow rounding of four seasons’ coasts,
In autumn teach three seasons’ fires
And four birds’ notes.

I should tell summer from the trees, the worms
Tell, if at all, the winter’s storms
Or the funeral of the sun;
I should learn spring by the cuckooing,
And the slug should teach me destruction.

A worm tells summer better than the clock,
The slug’s a living calendar of days;
What shall it tell me if a timeless insect
Says the world wears away?

Dylan Thomas
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